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New directive requires health care professionals to undergo implicit bias training in Michigan

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Posted at 11:48 AM, Jul 09, 2020
and last updated 2020-07-10 10:39:43-04

LANSING, Mich. (WXYZ) — Governor Gretchen Whitmer has signed an executive directive requiring Michigan health care professionals to undergo implicit bias training "to help reduce racial and other disparities in delivery of medical services."

The measure directs the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) to begin developing rules that will require implicit bias training as part of the knowledge and skills necessary for licensure, registration and renewal of licenses and registrations of health professionals in the state.

As of July 5, Black Michiganders represented 14 percent of the state population, but 40 percent of confirmed COVID-19 deaths in which the race of the patient was known, according to the state. COVID-19 is over four times more prevalent among Black Michiganders than among white Michiganders.

Implicit bias training was one of the recommendations made by the Michigan Coronavirus Task Force on Racial Disparities, which Gov. Whitmer created in response to the devastating and disproportionate impact the pandemic has had on communities of color.

"There's no doubt that our front line health care workers like doctors and nurses have been the real heroes of this crisis, putting their lives on the line for us every day," said Governor Whitmer. "COVID-19 has had a disparate impact on people of color due to a variety of factors, and we must do everything we can to address this disparity. The evidence shows that training in implicit bias can make a positive difference, so today we are taking action to help improve racial equity across Michigan's health care system. That’s why my staff has begun this kind of training and every member of my team, including me, will complete this type of training on an annual basis.”
“The existing health disparities highlighted during the coronavirus pandemic have made it clear that there is more work to do to ensure people of color have the same access to the same quality of health care as everyone else,” said Lt. Governor Gilchrist II, chair of the Michigan Coronavirus Task Force on Racial Disparities. “By providing awareness to health care workers on how to recognize and mitigate implicit bias, we can help them carry out their mission of providing the best health care to every patient they serve.”

The National Healthcare Disparities Report concluded that white patients received care of a higher quality than Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and Asian Americans. According to the state, people of color face more barriers to accessing health care than white people and are generally less satisfied with their interactions with health care providers.

“There is no question that our healthcare workers have risked their own lives and saved countless others during the COVID pandemic,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services chief medical executive and chief deputy director for health. “But the fact is that implicit bias exists, and studies show that it can have an impact on health outcomes. Every healthcare professional should be trained in implicit bias so that we can make sure everyone, regardless of their race or ethnicity, has access to the highest quality care.”

Under Executive Directive 2020-7, LARA is required to consult with relevant stakeholders in the medical profession, in state government and elsewhere in the community by November 1, 2020 to help determine relevant goals and concerns under the new rules. LARA will work in collaboration with the relevant professional boards and task forces to promulgate the rules.

View Executive Directive 2020-7 here.

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer's orders since the outbreak, coronavirus' impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

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