News

Actions

First Michigan waterways designated as state water trails

CORP-Digital-Default-Image-1280x720-WXYZ.png
Posted at 1:32 PM, Dec 20, 2018
and last updated 2018-12-20 14:41:11-05

Eight waterways have been selected as the first state-designated water trails in Michigan, the Department of Natural Resources announced.

The waterways include:

  • Central River Raisin Water Trail, 11 miles in Monroe County
  • Chain of Lakes Water Trail, more than 80 miles in Antrim and Kalkaska counties
  • Huron River Water Trail, 104 miles in Livingston, Oakland, Washtenaw and Wayne counties
  • Island Loop Route, 10 miles in St. Clair County
  • Flint River Trail, 72 miles in Genesee and Lapeer counties
  • Middle Grand River Water Trail, 87 miles in Clinton, Eaton, Ingham and Ionia counties
  • Shiawassee River Trail, 88 miles in Genesee, Oakland, Saginaw and Shiawassee counties
  • Upper Grand River Water Trail, 91 miles in Eaton, Ingham and Jackson counties.

A water trail is a designated route on a navigable waterway such as a lake, river, canal or bay, that is designed and managed to create a positive outdoor recreation experience for the user. Water trails feature well-developed access points, often are near significant historical, environmental or cultural points of interest and often have nearby amenities like restaurants, hotels and campgrounds.

“Water trails naturally are an increasing trend in Michigan and throughout the country, as interest in paddle sports and other water-based recreation continues to grow,” said DNR Parks and Recreation Chief Ron Olson. “We are pleased to help advance these opportunities by recognizing model public water trails that set the standard for future of Michigan’s water trails program.”

Over the last several months, the DNR has worked on creating a water trails program with the goal of announcing the first designations in 2018. Local water trail organizations with established water trail plans were invited to submit applications for designation.
“Today’s announcement celebrates our state’s connections to the Great Lakes coast and Michigan’s inland waters,” said Office of the Great Lakes Director Jon Allan. “We have made significant investments with community partners to build, market and maintain water trails. This program is the culmination of a commitment to public access and opportunities for recreation on Great Lakes waters – especially important as we see paddle sports gain tremendously in popularity.”
“Today’s announcement celebrates our state’s connections to the Great Lakes coast and Michigan’s inland waters,” said Office of the Great Lakes Director Jon Allan. “We have made significant investments with community partners to build, market and maintain water trails. This program is the culmination of a commitment to public access and opportunities for recreation on Great Lakes waters – especially important as we see paddle sports gain tremendously in popularity.”