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Here's the best time to catch the Lyrid meteor shower

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Posted at 5:37 PM, Apr 22, 2019
and last updated 2019-04-22 19:39:14-04

(WXYZ) — Each year we get several chances to see excitement in the night time sky. It has been a longer wait than normal though this year. The Lyrid meteor shower peaks tonight after a drought of meteors so far this year, with the last show that occurred happening in early January.

Overnight, you need to look high in the northeast sky in the early morning hours around 3 a.m. to get your best look. Debris from Comet Thatcher runs through the earth's orbit and gives us a chance to make a wish on a "falling star." The pace of meteors should be around 15 to 20 per hour as the meteors streak across the sky at a speed of 110,000 mph. When they hit the earth's upper atmosphere, the friction heats them up and they glow.

The Annual Perseid Meteor Shower
SPRUCE KNOB, WV - AUGUST 12: In this NASA handout, a 30 second exposure of a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Perseid meteor shower August 12, 2016 in Spruce Knob, West Virginia. The annual display, known as the Perseid shower because the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, is a result of Earth's orbit passing through debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA viaGetty Images)
The Annual Perseid Meteor Shower
SPRING MOUNTAINS NATIONAL RECREATION AREA, NV - AUGUST 13: A Perseid meteor streaks across the sky above desert pine trees on August 13, 2015 in the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Nevada. The annual display, known as the Perseid shower because the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, is a result of Earth's orbit passing through debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

To give yourself the best chance tonight of seeing them, you should get to the darkest place you can and give your eyes 20 to 30 minutes to adjust to the dark. Stay off of your phone too because that little light will still not allow your eyes to adjust the best they can. Unfortunately, last night would have been a better night as far as the weather is concerned to see more meteors, but you still may get a chance tonight. Clouds will be increasing overnight from the west, so getting out to take a look a little earlier than the peak would be smart. Heading farther northeast in our area will help, too.

NASA will livestream the meteor shower here.

Good luck and happy hunting.

The Annual Perseid Meteor Shower From Bryce Canyon National Park
BRYCE CANYON NATIONAL PARK, UT - AUGUST 12: A Perseid meteor streaks across the sky above Inspiration Point early on August 12, 2016 in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah. The annual display, known as the Perseid shower because the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, is a result of Earth's orbit passing through debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)