NewsRegionMacomb County

Actions

Former Macomb County Prosecutor Eric Smith directed corruption coverup witness says

Posted at 6:12 PM, Jul 13, 2021
and last updated 2021-07-13 18:18:40-04

MOUNT CLEMENS, Mich. (WXYZ) — William Weber owns the security company that installed security cameras at the home of former Macomb County Prosecutor Eric Smith.

Weber testified that he got to know and “love” Smith over the years like a brother and “looked up to him” over several years and that friendship helped increase his business.

Weber also testified that after an investigation started, Weber was directed by Smith to make up a fake invoice to cover up that the cameras were installed at Smith’s home and instead made to look like they were installed at county offices.

Michigan State Police removed the cameras at Smith’s home in May of 2019.

The Michigan Attorney General charged Smith with ten felony counts including Embezzlement, Running a Criminal Enterprise, Conspiracy, and Tampering with Evidence, up to 20 years in prison. The case centers on Smith allegedly using $600,000 in drug and alcohol forfeiture funds as a personal slush fund.

Weber was also charged in the case with four felonies including Forgery, and Embezzlement and facing up to ten years in prison. He took a plea deal with charges reduced to testify against Smith.

There was also testimony from Weber that Smith assigned an assistant prosecutor to get “dirt” on Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel. Hackel requested the state investigation into Smith after auditors found 4 off-book bank accounts where Smith kept and controlled the forfeiture funds.

In another part of the case, how much did Smith allegedly steal?

Smith’s Defense Attorney John Dakmak asked Michigan State Police Detective Sergeant Chris Corriveau, “You don’t have evidence to show that $600,000 was embezzled, correct?”

Corriveau answered on the witness stand, “That’s not the total amount that’s been charged in the complaint, no sir.”

Smith is free on bond. His preliminary exam is set to continue on August 16.

Smith pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice with the feds. His sentencing, in that case, is on hold until this state case is finished.