NewsCoronavirus

Actions

Boating, jet-skiing banned under Michigan stay-at-home order; kayaking allowed

CORP-Digital-Default-Image-1280x720-WXYZ.png
Posted at 4:45 PM, Apr 10, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-10 16:45:41-04

(WXYZ) — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer extended the state's stay-at-home order on Thursday, and using a motorboat, jet ski or other similar watercraft is not allowed.

The state clarified the order in a FAQ section, asking if boating constituted an outdoor activity

Related: Golf is 'not necessary to sustain life' and still banned under stay-at-home order, Whitmer says

While physical outdoor activity is allowed, like kayaking, canoeing and sailing, "using a motorboat, a jet ski, or other similar watercraft is not. Any outdoor activity permitted under the order, including boating, must be done in a manner consistent with social distancing, and individuals should use only their own equipment to prevent the transmission of the virus through the touching of shared surfaces."

Related: No traveling between residences under extended stay-at-home order

"While some boating is permitted under the order, the provision of boating services or supplies does not itself constitute critical infrastructure work, and businesses and operations may not designate workers to come to work for that purpose. As needed, these businesses and operations may designate workers to leave their home for work if their in-person presence is strictly necessary to conduct the minimum basic operations listed in section 4(b) of the order. Minimum basic operations do not include serving members of the public. The order, however, does permit in-person work necessary to maintain the safety and sanitation of sites otherwise open to the public for outdoor physical activity permitted under the order. All in-person work permitted under the order must be done in accordance with the mitigation measures listed in section 10 of the order," the clarification reads.

The Department of Natural Resources has gotten many reports about the heavy use of boat launches across the state, and the congregation of people at the launches.

"In addition, people who use motorized watercraft typically have to procure secondary services for their craft, such as parts and gasoline, that could unnecessarily increase contact with others and spread disease," the DNR said. "The hope is that the prohibition on the use of motorized watercraft will reduce the movement of people within the state and potential contact among people, with the intent of slowing the spread of the coronavirus."

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Read our daily Coronavirus Live Blog for the latest updates and news on coronavirus.
Additional Coronavirus information and resources:
Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer's orders since the outbreak, coronavirus' impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.
Read our daily Coronavirus Live Blog for the latest updates and news on coronavirus.
View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.
Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer's orders since the outbreak, coronavirus' impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.
Find out how you can help metro Detroit restaurants struggling during the pandemic.
View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.
See all of our Helping Each Other stories.
Find out how you can help metro Detroit restaurants struggling during the pandemic.
See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.
See all of our Helping Each Other stories.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.