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Mom wins fight against NCAA satellite camp ban

Posted at 5:28 PM, Apr 29, 2016

One mom asked for your help making sure talented high school athletes have the best chance at achieving their dreams. You responded.

Thousands signed her petition calling on the NCAA to throw out its ban on college coaches recruiting at camps off campus. Now, the NCAA is taking action.

Rozlyn Peoples had seen her son Donovan Peoples-Jones make the honor roll, serve his community, and become a respected high school athlete. The Cass Tech wide receiver is one of the nation’s top 5 prospects in the class of 2017.

She gives credit in part to the Sound Mind Sound Body Football camp.

“They stress academics, athletics and being a good person on and off the field,” said Donovan.

The annual camp in Detroit gives kids the chance to learn life lessons and compete before college coaches. Many kids, like the son of Cass Tech Coach Thomas Wilcher, have walked away with scholarships.

“He competed at the camp, ended up getting a scholarship. Cost me zero. I am a teacher. I don’t get a lot of money. It means a lot,” said Coach Wilchers.

“That’s what Sound Mind Sound Body has been, an opportunity for thousands and thousands of people,” said Michigan Football Coach Jim Harbaugh after the NCAA banned recruiting at such camps earlier this month.

Why did the NCAA put the ban in place?

Southern colleges complained to the NCAA that bigger universities - such as the University of Michigan - invaded their territory with satellite camps around the country. They said hold camps only at your campus. The NCAA agreed.

“I want to thank you for bringing awareness to this issue,” said Roslyn Peoples.

7 Action News shared the story of her petition effort. She said she started it because she felt the NCAA may be hurting middle-class and low income kids.

“A lot of these kids don’t have someone to take them across town, let alone out of town,” said Roslyn.

This week the NCAA did just what her petition called for.

“Because of that we’re changing lives,” said Rozlyn. “These boys will now have the opportunity to compete for a college education in front of coaches across the country.”